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rollingstone:

We tagged along with Sharon Jones as she prepped for her show at New York’s Beacon Theatre - take a look at the gallery.

04.16.14 146

kiefferjohn:

Phil Cohran on Chic-A-Go-Go

AACM co-founder and the missing link between Sun Ra and Earth, Wind & Fire on Chicago’s cable TV dance show for kids of all ages!

This is either inspired or possibly insane TV formatting!  One of the presenters is manic, the other almost comatose and Phil is well, just dignified.

04.15.14 6
Plays: 39
audio

jazzinbooks:

Phil Cohran and Legacy 

Cohran’s Blues 

African Skies

Captcha Records 


I’m in a bluesy, yet spiritual mood today.  

enjoy

nobigstory:

KELAN PHIL COHRAN & LEGACYWhite Nile" (Captcha Records, 2010)

Recorded live at the Planetarium of Chicago in 1993, very soon after SUN RA's death, the album African Skies is illuminated elegiac tribute album. PHIL COHRAN (ex-musician of the Sun Ra Arkestra in 59-61) brings us closer to enlightenment through eight sublime songs glowing with reverent spirit and positive, utopian energies. Utterly amazing stuff, for your soul.

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Zoom katalystentertainment:

"Frankenphone"When the Arkestra moved from Chicago in 1961, Phillip Cohran declined to accompany them. In 1965 he participated in the formation of the AACM. Cohran formed the Artistic Heritage Ensemble with Pete Cosey, future members of the Earth, Wind and Fire horn section and “Master” Henry Gibson (the Motown house percussionist) among others. By this time, he was playing the harp as well as cornet, as well as other brass instruments, such as the french horn, baritone saxophone and percussion. On the Beach is an available recording which documents their music around 1967-68.Early in his career he invented an instrument he calls the Frankiphone, aka the Space Harp heard on some of Sun Ra’s early albums. The instrument is actually an electrified mbira or kalimba. This instrument inspired Maurice White to use an electrified Kalimba in performance with Earth, Wind and Fire. Cohran states he taught Maurice and his brothers music in their youth, much like The Wailers were tutored by Joe Higgs. On the Beach documents their work during those early years and features the Frankiphone on the title track, as well as a piece called “New Frankiphone Blues”.wiki

katalystentertainment:

"Frankenphone"

When the Arkestra moved from Chicago in 1961, Phillip Cohran declined to accompany them. In 1965 he participated in the formation of the AACM. Cohran formed the Artistic Heritage Ensemble with Pete Cosey, future members of the Earth, Wind and Fire horn section and “Master” Henry Gibson (the Motown house percussionist) among others. By this time, he was playing the harp as well as cornet, as well as other brass instruments, such as the french horn, baritone saxophone and percussion. On the Beach is an available recording which documents their music around 1967-68.

Early in his career he invented an instrument he calls the Frankiphone, aka the Space Harp heard on some of Sun Ra’s early albums. The instrument is actually an electrified mbira or kalimba. This instrument inspired Maurice White to use an electrified Kalimba in performance with Earth, Wind and Fire. Cohran states he taught Maurice and his brothers music in their youth, much like The Wailers were tutored by Joe Higgs. On the Beach documents their work during those early years and features the Frankiphone on the title track, as well as a piece called “New Frankiphone Blues”.
wiki

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Zoom themostnominated:

Phil Cohran

themostnominated:

Phil Cohran

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Zoom padaviya:

The Gulabi gang (from Hindi gulabi, “pink”, transln. “pink gang”) is a group of women vigilantes and activists originally from Banda in Bundelkhand district, Uttar Pradesh, India, but reported to be active across North India as of 2010. It is named after the pink saris worn by its members. The gang was founded in 2006 by Sampat Pal Devi, a mother of five and former government health worker (and a former child bride), as a response to widespread domestic abuse and other violence against women. Gulabis visit abusive husbands and beat them up with laathis (bamboo sticks) unless they stop abusing their wives. In 2008, they stormed an electricity office in Banda district and forced officials to turn back the power they had cut in order to extract bribes. They have also stopped child marriages and protested dowry and female illiteracy.

padaviya:

The Gulabi gang (from Hindi gulabi, “pink”, transln. “pink gang”) is a group of women vigilantes and activists originally from Banda in Bundelkhand district, Uttar Pradesh, India, but reported to be active across North India as of 2010. It is named after the pink saris worn by its members.

The gang was founded in 2006 by Sampat Pal Devi, a mother
of five and former government health worker (and a former child bride), as a response to widespread domestic abuse and other violence against women. Gulabis visit abusive husbands and beat them up with laathis (bamboo sticks) unless they stop abusing their wives. In 2008, they stormed an electricity office in Banda district and forced officials to turn back the power they had cut in order to extract bribes. They have also stopped child marriages and protested dowry and female illiteracy.

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Zoom notjessatall:

Sampat Pal Devi and members of the Pink Sari Gang 

The Pink Sari Gang, or Gulabi (pink) Gang, is a group of several hundred vigilante women in India, committed to protecting women against social malpractice, corrupt administrators, and abusive husbands.

notjessatall:

Sampat Pal Devi and members of the Pink Sari Gang 

The Pink Sari Gang, or Gulabi (pink) Gang, is a group of several hundred vigilante women in India, committed to protecting women against social malpractice, corrupt administrators, and abusive husbands.

04.15.14 595

upfromsumdirt:

PBS DOC: independent lens - brothers hypnotic / the principle of simplicity

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Zoom pbstv:

The eight members of the Hypnotic Brass Ensemble are all sons of Phil Cohran, a legendary trumpeter who turned his back on commercial music to pursue astral jazz.
Now well-known musicians in their own right, they find the ideals bred into them by their father repeatedly tested. Experience the band’s signature sound when Brothers Hypnotic premieres Monday (4/7) on independentlenspbs.
See a preview.

pbstv:

The eight members of the Hypnotic Brass Ensemble are all sons of Phil Cohran, a legendary trumpeter who turned his back on commercial music to pursue astral jazz.

Now well-known musicians in their own right, they find the ideals bred into them by their father repeatedly tested. Experience the band’s signature sound when Brothers Hypnotic premieres Monday (4/7) on independentlenspbs.

See a preview.

04.15.14 25
Black Power Movement

blackindiecinema:

Independent Lens Q&A: Contextualizing the Black Power Movement for a New Generation

04.15.14 1
I Was Racially Profiled in My Own Driveway

It was an otherwise ordinary snow day in Hartford, Connecticut, and I was laughing as I headed outside to shovel my driveway. I’d spent the morning scrambling around, trying to stay ahead of my three children’s rising housebound energy, and once my shovel hit the snow, I thought about how my wife had been urging me to buy a snowblower. I hadn’t felt an urgent need. Whenever it got ridiculously blizzard-like, I hired a snow removal service. And on many occasions, I came outside to find that our next door neighbor had already cleared my driveway for me.

Never mind that our neighbor was an empty-nester in his late 60s with a replaced hip, and I was a former professional ballplayer in his early 40s. I kept telling myself I had to permanently flip the script and clear his driveway. But not today. I had to focus on making sure we could get our car out for school the next morning. My wife was at a Black History Month event with our older two kids. The snow had finally stopped coming down and this was my mid-afternoon window of opportunity.

Just as I was good-naturedly turning all this over in my mind, my smile disappeared.

A police officer from West Hartford had pulled up across the street, exited his vehicle, and begun walking in my direction. I noted the strangeness of his being in Hartford—an entirely separate town with its own police force—so I thought he needed help. He approached me with purpose, and then, without any introduction or explanation he asked, “So, you trying to make a few extra bucks, shoveling people’s driveways around here?”

All of my homeowner confidence suddenly seemed like an illusion.

Read the rest ->

04.15.14 193
'The Maya Rudolph Show' Is Coming To NBC w/ Craig Robinson, Janelle Monae, Raphael Saadiq Featuring | Shadow and Act

blackgirlstalking:

How excited are you? As excited as I am, I hope. Because, I’m like mach 5 funfetti level excited.

~Aurelia

04.15.14 171
Zoom dianeaudreyngako:

Leonce Raphael AgbodjelouUntitled (Musclemen series), 2012

dianeaudreyngako:

Leonce Raphael Agbodjelou
Untitled (Musclemen series), 2012

04.15.14 14
Zoom aljazeeraamerica:

Abu Ghraib closes, bitter memories of torture remain

The prison at Abu Ghraib was notorious for its treatment of those confined within its walls long before U.S. Army Private Lynndie England dragged a naked Iraqi prisoner around on a dog leash.
Located some nine miles west of Baghdad in the Abu Ghraib district, Iraqis steered clear of the huge prison complex where, for decades, political prisoners brought there would disappear, and only wails of torture could be heard through the metal bars that covered its high windows. Executions ran into the hundreds per year. Relatives coming to find even the bodies of their loved ones often left with nothing.
Now, after struggling to maintain order over a system that houses over two thousand detainees, the Iraqi government has announced it is closing Abu Ghraib’s doors and transferring its inmates to other prisons throughout the country.

Continue reading

aljazeeraamerica:

Abu Ghraib closes, bitter memories of torture remain

The prison at Abu Ghraib was notorious for its treatment of those confined within its walls long before U.S. Army Private Lynndie England dragged a naked Iraqi prisoner around on a dog leash.

Located some nine miles west of Baghdad in the Abu Ghraib district, Iraqis steered clear of the huge prison complex where, for decades, political prisoners brought there would disappear, and only wails of torture could be heard through the metal bars that covered its high windows. Executions ran into the hundreds per year. Relatives coming to find even the bodies of their loved ones often left with nothing.

Now, after struggling to maintain order over a system that houses over two thousand detainees, the Iraqi government has announced it is closing Abu Ghraib’s doors and transferring its inmates to other prisons throughout the country.

Continue reading

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